The Common Core: Myths vs. Facts – The Common Core State Standards are not internationally benchmarked.

The Common Core: Myths vs. Facts – The Common Core State Standards are not internationally benchmarked.

Successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards requires parents, educators, policymakers, and other stakeholders to have the facts about what the standards are and what they are not. The following myths and facts aim to address common misconceptions about the development, intent, content, and implementation of the standards.

 

 

Myth: The Common Core State Standards are not internationally benchmarked.

 

Fact: Standards from top-performing countries played a significant role in the development of the math and English language arts/literacy standards. In fact, the college- and career-ready standards provide an appendix listing the evidence that was consulted in drafting the standards, including the international standards that were consulted in the development process.

 

Myth: The standards only include skills and do not address the importance of content knowledge.

 

Fact: The standards recognize that both content and skills are important.

 

The English language arts standards require certain critical content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are made at the state and local levels. In addition to content coverage, the standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

The mathematics standards lay a solid foundation in whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, and decimals. Taken together, these elements support a student’s ability to learn and apply more demanding math concepts and procedures. The middle school and high school standards call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real-world issues and challenges. They prepare students to think and reason mathematically. The standards set a rigorous definition of college and career readiness not by piling topic upon topic, but by demanding that students develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly do.

 

 

To find out more information about our documented results with school districts and their most struggling readers academic achievement, visit our website at http://sbsl.org/get-in-touch/ or call us at 610-398-1231 or email us today: info@sbsl.org

 

Resource: http://www.corestandards.org/about-the-standards/myths-vs-facts/