Lehigh University Studies

Learn how Step By Step Learning® successfully partnered with two districts with individual challenges to exponentially raise literacy proficiency rates. As a result school leaders, teachers, students and parents work collaboratively to employ evidence-based instructional techniques and data-driven decision protocols to ensure each student receives instruction to meet their individual needs. The results are clear, more students are reading proficiently than ever before!

Our schools are challenged with low economic student populations, high ELL populations, changing demographics, and more. Still, these schools are making a difference by learning what instructional techniques and overall processes and procedures translate to success for their students.

Independent, 3rd Party Research Validates Various Program Results

An Evaluation of the 2009-2010 Step By Step Learning® Implementation of Services in the Hazleton Area School District

The purpose of this evaluation was to determine whether the Step By Step Learning® comprehensive approach to literacy was effective in improving the literacy skills of kindergarten and first grade children in the Hazleton Area School District (HASD). This evaluation examined the outcomes of students in the HASD as compared to students in a school district that did not receive the same level of services from Step By Step Learning® (SBSL) and sought to answer three questions:

  1. Were the trainings implemented with fidelity?
  2. Did the groups have differences in DIBELS scores in kindergarten and first grade?
  3. Did the groups have differences in instructional recommendations in kindergarten and first grade?

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Click Here to Read a one Page Summary of the Evaluation

A Comparison of the Responsive Reading and Reading Recovery Interventions for the Pleasant Valley School District

The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the effectiveness of the Responsive Reading intervention in helping first grade students gain literacy skills and to determine whether students participating in the program have significant advantages over students participating in the Reading Recovery program. The evaluation sought to answer four questions:

  1. Do students demonstrate differences in selected literacy skills at the completion of the intervention?
  2. Do students demonstrate differences in selected literacy skills at the end of the year?
  3. Are there group differences in student achievement as measured by the DIBELS?
  4. Are there group differences in student performance as measured by the DIBELS during second grade?

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Report on Analysis of Outcomes of Implementation of an RTI model that included DIBELS, Data Analysis, LETRS training, coaching and mentoring: Pleasant Valley School District for 2004 to 2007

During the 2006 – 2007 school year, the kindergarten teachers of the Pleasant Valley School District received training in an RTI model that included mCLASS:DIBELS, Informal diagnostics, instructional modeling, coaching competency model, Data Analysis, and LETRS professional development through Step By Step Learning, LLC. Over the past three years, Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) data had been collected at fall, winter, and spring across all kindergarten students. This report provides an analysis of the outcomes across these years, using the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 years as pre-intervention periods. Although not a true control comparison, the demographic stability of the district across these years would suggest no expected differences in kindergarten school entry populations allowing this comparison to provide an effective method of discerning the impact of the training provided to teachers during the 2006-2007 school years.

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An Evaluation of the Teach Me To Read At Home™ Program

The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the effectiveness of the Teach Me To Read At Home™ program. The evaluation included cohorts from two years of the program, 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, and sought to answer five questions:

  1. What was the extent of participation in the program?
  2. What was the fidelity of the intervention?
  3. How did the program affect parents’ literacy behaviors at home, as indicated by parent report?
  4. What was the effectiveness of the program?
  5. Were there differences in emergent literacy skills between groups during the prekindergarten year?

Click Here to Read the complete Evaluation