How do I implement the Explicit Teacher Modeling  strategy?

How do I implement the Explicit Teacher Modeling strategy?

Ensure that your students have the prerequisite skills to perform the skill.

Break down the skill into logical and learnable parts (Ask yourself, “what do I do and what do I think as I perform the skill?”).

Provide a meaningful context for the skill (e.g. word or story problem suited to the age & interests of your students).

Provide visual, auditory, kinesthetic (movement), and tactile means for illustrating important aspects of the concept/skill (e.g. visually display word problem and equation, orally cue students by varying vocal intonations, point, circle, highlight computation signs or important information in story problems).

“Think aloud” as you perform each step of the skill (i.e. say aloud what you are thinking as you problem-solve).

Link each step of the problem solving process (e.g. restate what you did in the previous step, what you are going to do in the next step, and why the next step is important to the previous step).

Periodically check student understanding with questions, remodeling steps when there is confusion.

Maintain a lively pace while being conscious of student information processing difficulties (e.g. need additional time to process questions).

Model a concept/skill at least three times before beginning to scaffold your instruction.

 

How Does This Instructional Strategy Positively Impact Students Who Have Learning Problems?

 

Teacher as model makes the concept/skill clear and learnable.

High level of teacher support and direction enables student to make meaningful cognitive connections.

Provides students who have attention problems, processing problems, memory retrieval problems, & metacognitive difficulties an accessible “learning map”.

Links between subskills are directly made, making confusion and misunderstanding less likely.

Multi-sensory cueing provides students multiple modes to process and thereby learn information.

 

To find out more information about our documented results with school districts and their most struggling readers academic achievement, visit our website at https://sbsl.org/get-in-touch/ or call us at 610-398-1231 or email us today: info@sbsl.org 

Download your sample small group instructional toolkit here: https://sbsl.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Sample_Kit_Online.pdf

 

Resource: http://fcit.usf.edu/mathvids/strategies/em.html